Publications


Lindsay, D. S., Ross, B. H., & Hunt, R. R. (2023). Psychonomic Society publications: A participants’ account of the transition from self-publishing to partnering with Springer. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Graham et al. (2023). Mixed news about the bad news gameJournal of Cognition, 6(1), p.58.DOI: https://doi.org/10.5334/joc.324

Lindsay, D. S. (2023). A plea to psychology professional societies that publish journals: Assess computational reproducibility. Meta-Psychology, 7.

Mah, E. Y. & Lindsay, D. S. (2023). Variability across subjects in free recall versus cued recall. Memory & Cognition.

Mah,E. Y., Grannon, K. E. L., Campbell, A., Tamburri, N., Mameison, R. K., & Lindsay, D. S. (2023). A direct replication and extension of Popp and Serra (2016, Experiment 1): Better free recall and worse cued recall of animal names than object names, accounting for semantic similarity. Frontiers.

Williams, H. L., Bodner, G. E., & Lindsay, D. S. (2023). Recognition, remember-know, and confidence judgments: No evidence of cross-contamination here! Memory, 31, 905-917, DOI: 10.1080/09658211.2023.2207804.

Baldassari, M. J., Moore, K. N., Hyman, I. E., Hope, L., Mah, E. Y., Lindsay, D. S., Mansour, J., Saraiva, R., Horry, R., Rath, H., Kelly, L., Jones, R., Vale, S., Lawson, B., Pedretti, J., Palma, T. A., Cruz, F., Quarenta, J., Van der Cruyssen, I., … Wiechert, S. (2023). The effect of pre-event instructions on eyewitness identification. Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications, 8(1).

*Azad, T., Lindsay, D. S., & Zaragoza, M.S. (2022). Can suggestions of non-occurrence lead to claims that witnessed events did not happen? The Journal of General Psychology, 149(3), 349-370. https://doi.org/10.1080/00221309.2020.1860889

Fallow, K.M., & Lindsay, D.S. (2022). Subjective experiences of recognizing and not recognizing paintings and words. Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology, 76, 218–225. https://doi.org/10.1037/cep0000291

Fallow, K.M., & Lindsay, D.S. (2022). Test position effects on hit and false alarm rates in recognition memory for paintings and words. Memory & Cognition, 50, 378–396. https://doi.org/10.3758/s13421-021-01227-5

*Lindsay, D. S., & Mah, E. Y. (2021). Eyewitness identification can be studied in social contexts online with large samples in multi-lab collaborations. Journal of Applied Research on Memory and Cognition, 10(3), 328-334. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jarmac.2021.07.001

Lindsay, D. S. (2020). Commentary for special issue of Applied Cognitive Psychology in Honor of Alan Scoboria.  Applied Cognitive Psychology.  https://doi.org/10.1002/acp.3758

*Balazs, A., et al. (2020). A consensus-based transparency checklist. Nature Human Behavior, 4(1), 4-6.

Lindsay, D. S. (2020).  Seven Steps toward Transparency and Replicability in Psychological Science Canadian Psychology​/Psychologie Canadienne, 61, 310–317.

* Cohen, A. L., Silverstein, M. Derksen, D. G., Hamzagic, D, I, Bernstein, D. M., & Lindsay, D. S. (2020). Future planning may promote prospective false memories. Journal of Applied Research in memory and Cognition.

Lindsay, D. S. (2019) Swan song editorial.  Psychological Science, 30, 1669-1673.

Baldassari, M. J., Kantner, J. D., & Lindsay, D. S. (2019). The importance of decision bias for predicting eyewitness lineup choices: Toward a Lineup Skills Test. Cognitive Research: Principles & Implications. DOI: 10.1186/s41235-018-0150-3

Williams, H. L., & Lindsay, D. S. (2019). Different definitions of the nonrecollection-based response option(s) change how people use the “remember” response in the remember/know paradigm. Memory & Cognition, 47, 1359–1374. https://doi.org/10.3758/s13421-019-00938-0.

Mellor, D., Vazire, S., & Lindsay, D. S. (2019). Transparent science: A more credible, reproducible, and publishable way to do science. Chapter in R. J. Sternberg (Ed.), Guide to publishing in psychology journals (2nd ed) (pp. 219-237. Cambridge University Press.

Ito, H., Barzykowski, K., Grzesik, M., Gulgoz, S., Gürdere, C., Janssen, S., Khor, J., Rowthorn, H., Wade, K., Luna, K., Albuquerque, P., Kumar, D., Singh, A., Cecconello, W., Cadavid, S., Laird, N., Baldassari, M. J., Lindsay, D. S., & Mori, K. (2019). Eyewitness memory distortion following co-witness discussion: A replication of Garry, French, Kinzett, and Mori (2008) in ten countries. Journal of Applied Research in Memory & Cognition, 8, 66-77.

Newman, E. J., Azad, T., Lindsay, D. S., & Garry, M. (2018). Evidence that photos promote rosiness for claims about the future. Memory & Cognition, 46, 1223–1233.

Davis, W. E., Giner-Sorolla, R., Lindsay, D. S., Lougheed, J. P., Makel, M. C., Meier, M. E., Sun, J., Vaughn, L. A., & Zelniski, J. M. (2018). Peer review guidelines promoting replicability and transparency in psychological science.  Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science.

Wade, K. A. Nash, R. A., & Lindsay. D. S. (2018). Reasons to doubt the reliability of eyewitness memory: Commentary on Wixted, Mickes, and Fisher (2018). Perspectives on Psychological Science, 13, 339-342.

Lindsay, D. S. (2018). Replicability in psychological science. The Cognitive Psychology Bulletin, 3, 5-6.

Simons, D., Shoda, Y., & Lindsay, D. S. (2017). Constraints on Generality (COG): A proposed addition to all empirical papers. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 12, 1123-1128

Lindsay, D. S. (2017). Editorial: Preregistered direct replications in Psychological Science. Psychological Science, 12, 1123-1128.

Cardwell, B., Lindsay, D. S., Förster, K., & Garry, M. (2017). Uninformative photos can increase people’s perceived knowledge of complicated processes. Journal of Applied Research in Memory & Cognition, 6, 244-252.

Simons, D. S., Shoda, Y., & Lindsay, D. S. (2017). Constraints on generality (COG): A proposed addition to all empirical papers. Perspectives in Psychological Science.

Lindsay, D. S. (2017). Editorial: Sharing data and materials in Psychological Science. Psychological Science, 28, 699-702.

Scoboria, A., Wade, K. A., Lindsay, D. S., Azad, T., Strange, D., Ost, J., & Hyman, I. E. Jr. (2017). A mega-analysis of memory reports from eight peer-reviewed false memory implantation studies. Memory, 25, 146-163

Lindsay, D. S., Simons, D. S., & Lilienfeld, S. O. (2016, December). Research preregistration 101.  Observer, 30

Greene, D. M., Strange, D., Lindsay, D. S., & Takarangi, M. K. T. (2016). Trauma-related versus positive involuntary thoughts with and without meta-awareness. Consciousness and Cognition, 46, 163-172.

Lindsay, D. S., & Hyman, I. E. Jr. (2016). Commentary on Brewin and Andrews. Applied Cognitive Psychology.

Wixted, J. T., Read, J. D., & Lindsay, D.S. (2016). The effect of retention interval on the eyewitness identification confidence-accuracy relationship. Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition, 5, 192-203.

Connolly, D. A, & Lindsay, D. S (2016). A tribute out our friend, J. Don Read. Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition, 5, 97-99.

Lindsay, D. S. (2015). Replication in psychological science. Psychological Science, 26(12), 1827-1832.

D’Arcy, R., Lindsay, D. S., Song, X., Gawryluk, J. R., Greene, D., Mayo, C., Hajra, S. G., Mandziuk, L., Mathieson, J., & Greene, T. (2015). Long-term motor recovery after severe traumatic brain injury: Beyond established limits. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation. (online)

Newman, E. J., Garry, M., Unkelbach, C., Bernstein, D. M., Lindsay D. S., & Nash, R. A. (2015). Truthiness and falsiness of trivia claims depends on judgment contexts. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory & Cognition, 41, 1337-1348.

Takarangi, M. K. T., Lindsay, D. S., & Strange, D. (2015). Meta-awareness and the involuntary memory spectrum: Reply to Meyer, Otgaar, and Smeets (2015). Consciousness and Cognition, 34, 1-3.

Lindsay, D. S., Fallow, K. M., & Kantner, J. (2015).  Recognition memory response bias is conservative for paintings and we don’t know why.  In D. S. Lindsay, C. M. Kelley, A. P. Yonelinas, and H. L. Roediger III (Eds.), Remembering: Attributions, processes, and control in human memory (in honour of Larry L. Jacoby).  New York: Psychology Press. (Re-print available upon request.)

Kantner, J., & Lindsay, D. S. (2014).  Cross-situational consistency in recognition memory response bias.  Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 21(5), 1272-1280.

Takarangi, M. K. T., Strange, D., & Lindsay, D. S. (2014).  Cross-situational consistency in recognition memory response bias.Consciousness and Cognition, 27, 297-305.

Cowan, S., Read, J. D., & Lindsay, D.S. (2014). Predicting and postdicting eyewitness accuracy and confidence.  Journal of Applied Research on Memory and Cognition, 3(1), 21-30.

Kantner, J., & Lindsay, D. S. (2014).  Category exemplars normed in Canada. Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology 68(3), 163-165.

Yamada, R., Itsukushima, Y., Azad, T. & Lindsay, D. S. (2014).  Schema provoke false knowing even when schema-consistent targets had not been presented.  International Journal of Psychological Studies, 6(3), 62-70.

Lindsay, D. S. (2014).  Memory source monitoring applied.  In T. Perfect and D. S. Lindsay (Eds.), Sage handbook of applied memory (pp. 59-75). London, UK: Sage.

Kantner, J., & Lindsay, D. (2013). Top-down constraint on recognition memory. Memory & Cognition, 41(3), 465-479.

MacLean, C. L., Brimacombe, C., & Lindsay, D. (2013). Investigating industrial investigation: Examining the impact of a priori knowledge and tunnel vision education. Law and Human Behavior, 37(6), 441-453.

Newman, E., Garry, M., Bernstein, D. M., Kantner, J., & Lindsay, D. S. (2012). Nonprobative photographs (or words) inflate truthiness. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 19(5), 969-974.

Kantner, J., & Lindsay, D. S. (2012). Response bias in recognition memory as a cognitive trait. Memory & Cognition, 40(8), 1163-1177.

Brewer, N., Weber, N., Wooten, D., & Lindsay, D. S. (2012). Identifying the bad guy in a lineup using deadlined confidence judgments. Psychological Science, 23(10), 1208-1214.

Cohen, A-L., Kantner, J., Dixon, R. A., & Lindsay, D. S. (2011).  The intention interference effect: The difficulty of ignoring what you intend to do.  Experimental Psychology, 58(6), 425-433.

Lindsay, D. S., & Kantner, J. (2011).  A search for influences of feedback on recognition of music, poetry, and art.  In P. Higham & J. Leboe (Eds.), Constructions of remembering and metacognition: Essays in honor of Bruce Whittlesea (pp. 137-154). Houndmills, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.

Lindsay, D. S. (2011). How I got started. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 26(3), 497-498.

Strange, D., Garry, M., Bernstein, D. M., & Lindsay, D. S. (2011). Photographs cause false memories for the news.  Acta Psychologica, 136(1), 90-94.

Kantner, J., & Lindsay, D. S. (2010). Can corrective feedback improve recognition memory? Memory & Cognition 38(4), 389-406.

Newman, E., & Lindsay, D. S. (2009).  False memories: What the hell are they for? Applied Cognitive Psychology, 23(8), 1105-1121.

Blandon-Gitlin, I., Pezdek, K., Lindsay, D. S., & Hagen, L. (2009). Criteria-based content analysis of true and suggested accounts of events. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 23(7), 901-917.

Nash, R. S., Wade, K., & Lindsay, D. S. (2009). Digitally manipulating memory: Effects of doctored videos and imagination in distorting beliefs and memories. Memory & Cognition, 37(4), 414-424.

Breuer, A., Masson, M. E. J., Cohen, A.-L., & Lindsay, D. S.  (2009). Long-term repetition priming of briefly identified objects. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 35(2), 487-498.

Geraerts, E., Lindsay, D. S., Merckelbach H., Jelicic, M., Raymaekers, L., Arnold, M. M., & Schooler, J. W. (2009). Cognitive mechanisms underlying recovered memory experiences of childhood sexual abuse.  Psychological Science, 20(1), 92-98.

Boyce. M., Lindsay, D. S., & Brimacombe, C. A. E. (2008).  Investigating investigators: Examining the impact of eyewitness identification evidence on student-investigatorsLaw and Human Behavior, 32(5), 439-453.

Dahl, L. C., Brimacombe, C. A. E., & Lindsay, D. S. (2008).  Investigating investigators: How presentation order influences participant-investigators’ interpretations of eyewitness identification and alibi evidence.  Law and Human Behavior, 33(5), 368-380.

Lindsay, D. S. (2008). Source monitoring and eyewitness memory. In B. L. Cutler (Ed.), Encyclopedia of psychology and law (pp. 748-750). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Lindsay, D. S. (2008). Source monitoring. In H. L. Roediger, III (Ed.), Cognitive psychology of memory. Vol. 2 of Learning and memory: A comprehensive reference, 4 vols. (J. Byrne, Editor), pp. 325-347. Oxford: Elsevier.

Turtle, J., Read, J. D., Lindsay, D. S., & Brimacombe, C. A. E. (2008). Toward a more informative psychological science of eyewitness evidence. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 22(6), 769–778.

Gruppuso, V., Lindsay, D. S., & Masson, M. E. J. (2007). I’d know that face anywhere! Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 14(6), 1085-1089.

Arnold, M. M., & Lindsay, D. S. (2007). “I remember/know/guess that I knew-it-all-along!”: Subjective experience versus objective measures of the knew-it-all-along effect.  Memory & Cognition, 35, 1854-1868.

Lindsay, D. S. (2007). Order effects in collaborative memory contamination?  Comment on Gabbert, Memon, and Wright (2006). Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 14, 1010.

Benner, E. L., & Lindsay, D. S. (2007). Memory of remembering: Investigating the forgot-it-all-along effect using pictures. Psi Chi Journal of Undergraduate Research, 12.

Lindsay, D. S. (2007). Autobiographical memory, eyewitness reports, and public policy. Canadian Psychology, 48,  57-66.

Lindsay, D. S., & Read, J. D. (2006). Adults’ memories of long-past events. In L. G. Nilsson & N. Ohta (Eds.), Memory and society: Psychological perspectives (pp. 43-64). New York: Psychology Press.

Dahl, L. C., Lindsay, D. S., & Brimacombe, C. A. E. (2006). Investigating investigators: Examining witnesses’ influence on investigators. Law and Human Behavior, 30, 707-732.

Geraerts, E., Arnold, M. M., Lindsay, D. S., Merckelbach, H., Jelicic, M., & Hauer, B. (2006). Forgetting of prior remembering in persons reporting recovered memories of childhood sexual abuse. Psychological Science, 17, 1002-1008.

Woodward, T. S., Moritz, S., Arnold, M. M., Cuttler, C., Whitman, J.C., & Lindsay, D. S. (2006). Increased hindsight bias in schizophrenia. Neuropsychology, 20, 461-467.

Arnold, M. M., & Lindsay, D. S. (2005). Remembering remembering. In A. M. Surprenant, G. Francis, & I. Neath (Eds.), CogLab Reader(pp. 293-309). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth. (Reprinted from Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 28, 521-529).

Cohen, A.-L., Dixon, R. A., & Lindsay, D. S. (2005). The intention interference effect and aging: Similar magnitude effects for young and old adults. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 19, 1177-1198.

Arnold, M. M., & Lindsay, D. S. (2005). Remembrance of remembrance past. Memory, 13, 533-549.

Lindsay, D. S., Hagen, L., Read, J. D., Wade, K. A., & Garry, M. (2004). True photographs and false memories. Psychological Science, 15, 149-154.

Donovan, C-L., Lindsay, D. S., & Kingstone, A. (2004). Flexible and abstract resolutions to crossmodal conflicts. Brain and Cognition, 56, 1-4.

Bukach, C. M., Bub, D. N., Masson, M. E. J., & Lindsay, D. S. (2004). Category specificity in normal episodic learning: Applications to category-specific agnosia. Cognitive Psychology, 48, 1-46.

Lindsay, D. S., Allen, B. P., Chan, J. C. K., & Dahl, L. C. (2004). Eyewitness suggestibility and source similarity: Intrusions of details from one event into memory reports of another event. Journal of Memory and Language, 50, 96-111.

Lindsay, D. S., Wade, K. A., Hunter, M. A., & Read, J. D. (2004). Adults’ memories of childhood: Affect, knowing, and remembering. Memory, 12, 27-43.

Jacoby, L. L., Lindsay, D. S., & Hessels, S. (2003). Item-specific control of automatic processes: Stroop process dissociations. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 10, 638-344.

Cohen, A-L., Dixon, R. A., Lindsay, D. S., & Masson, M. E. J. (2003). The effect of perceptual distinctiveness on the prospective and retrospective components of prospective memory in young and old adults. Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology, 57, 274-289.

Bodner, G. E., & Lindsay, D. S. (2003). Remembering and knowing in context. Journal of Memory and Language, 48, 563-580.

Poole, D. A., & Lindsay, D. S. (2002). Children’s suggestibility in the forensic context. In M. L. Eisen,  J. A. Quas, & G. S. Goodman,  (Eds.), Memory and suggestibility in the forensic interview (pp. 355-381).

Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum. Lindsay, D. S. (2002). Children’s source monitoring. In H. L. Westcott, G. Davies, & R. H. C. Bull (Eds.), Children’s testimony: Psychological research and forensic practice (pp. 83-98). Sussex, England: John Wiley and Sons.

Wade, K. A., Garry, M., Read, J. D., & Lindsay, D. S. (2002). A picture is worth a thousand lies: Using false photographs to create false childhood memories. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 9, 597-603.

Poole, D. A., & Lindsay, D. S. (2002). Reducing child witnesses’ false reports of misinformation from parents. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 81, 117-140.

Lindsay, D. S. (2002). JEP:General in the 21st century. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 131, 3-4.

Arnold, M. M., & Lindsay, D. S. (2002). Remembering remembering. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, & Cognition, 28, 521-529.

Lindsay, D. S., & Johnson, M. K. (2001). False memories, fuzzy trace theory, and the source monitoring framework. Learning and Individual Differences, 12, 145-161.

Poole, D. A., & Lindsay, D. S. (2001). Children’s eyewitness reports after exposure to misinformation from parents. Journal of Experimental Psych: Applied, 7, 27-50.

Lindsay, D. S., & Read, J. D. (2001). The recovered memories controversy: Where do we go from here? In G. Davies & T. Dalgleish (Eds.), Recovered memories: Seeking the middle ground (pp. 71-94). London: Wiley.

Read, J. D., & Lindsay, D. S. (2000). “Amnesia” for summer camps and high school graduation: Memory work increases reports of prior periods of remembering less. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 13, 129-147.

Lindsay, D. S., Nilsen, E., & Read, J. D. (2000). Witnessing-condition heterogeneity and witnesses’ versus investigators’ confidence in the accuracy of witnesses’ identification decisions. Law and Human Behavior, 24, 685-697.

Payne, D. G., Klin, C. M., Lampinen, J. M., Neuschatz, J. S., & Lindsay, D. S. (1999). Memory applied. In F. Durso et al. (Eds.), Handbook of applied cognitive psychology (pp. 83-113). New York: Wiley.

Lindsay, D. S. (1999). Recovered-memory experiences. In S. Taub (Ed.), Recovered memories of child sexual abuse: Psychological, social, and legal perspectives on a contemporary mental health controversy (pp. 142-164). Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas.

Lindsay, D. S. (1998). De-polarizing views on recovered-memory experiences. In S. J. Lynn & K. McConkey (Eds.), Truth in memory (pp. 481-494). New York: Guilford Press.

Read, J. D., Lindsay, D. S., & Nichols, T. (1998). The relation between confidence and accuracy in eyewitness identification studies: Is the conclusion changing? In C. P. Thomson, D. Bruce, J. D. Read, D. Hermann, D. Payne, & M. P. Toglia (Eds.), Eyewitness memory: Theoretical and applied perspectives (pp. 107-130). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Lindsay, D. S., & Poole, D. A. (1998). The Poole et al. (1995) surveys of therapists: Misinterpretations by both sides of the recovered memories controversy. Journal of Psychiatry and Law, Fall, 26, 383-399.

Poole, D. A., & Lindsay, D. S. (1998). Assessing the accuracy of young children’s reports: Lessons from the investigation of child sexual abuse. Journal of Applied and Preventative Psychology, 7, 1-26.

Lindsay, D. S., Read, J. D., & Sharma, K. (1998). Accuracy and confidence in person identification: The relationship is strong when witnessing conditions vary widely. Psychological Science, 9, 215-218.

Lindsay, D. S. (1998). Recovered memories and social justice. American Psychologist, 53, 486-487.

Poole, D. A., & Lindsay, D. S. (1998). Uses and abuses of the Poole et al. (1995) data. American Psychologist, 53, 681-682.

Allen, B. P., & Lindsay, D. S. (1998). Amalgamations of memories: Intrusions of information from one event into reports of another. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 12, 277-285.

Lindsay, D. S. (1997, November). Recovered-memory experiences: Explaining true and false delayed memories of childhood sexual abuse. Psychology Place (www.psychplace.com)

Gruppuso, V., Lindsay, D. S., & Kelley, C. M. (1997). The process dissociation procedure and similarity: Defining and estimating recollection and familiarity in recognition memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 23, 259-278.

Lindsay, D. S., & Read, J. D. (1997). Controversy and polarization: Response to McEvoy (1995). Trauma, 7(1), 40-42.

Poole, D. A., Lindsay, D. S., Memon, A., & Bull, R. (1997). Did Pope (1996) read a different Poole, Lindsay, Memon, and Bull (1995)? Comments on “Memory, Abuse, and Science”. American Psychologist, 52, 990-993.

Lindsay, D. S., & Briere, J. (1997). The controversy regarding recovered memories of childhood sexual abuse: Pitfalls, bridges, and future directions. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 12, 631-647.

Lindsay, D. S. (1997). Jane Doe in context: Sex abuse, lives, and video tape. Child Maltreatment, 2, 187-192.

Trainham, T., Lindsay, D. S., & Jacoby, L. L. (1997). Stroop process dissociations: Reply to Hillstrom and Logan (1997). Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 23, 1579-1587.

Lindsay, D. S. (1997). Increasing sensitivity. In J. D. Read & D. S. Lindsay (Eds.), Recollections of trauma: Scientific evidence and clinical practice (pp. 1-16). New York: Plenum.

Lindsay, D. S. (1997). Comments on Courtois. In J. D. Read & D. S. Lindsay (Eds.), Recollections of trauma: Scientific evidence and clinical practice (pp. 361-368). New York: Plenum.

Lindsay, D. S., & Schooler, J. W. (1997). ASI participants questionnaire. In J. D. Read & D. S. Lindsay (Eds.), Recollections of trauma: Scientific evidence and clinical practice (pp. 563-564). New York: Plenum.

Lindsay, D. S., & Kelley, C. M. (1996). Creating illusions of familiarity in a cued recall remember/know paradigm. Journal of Memory and Language, 35, 197-211.

Lindsay, D. S., Poole, D. A., Memon, A., & Bull, R. (1996). Rejoinder to Pope’s (1995) comments regarding Poole, Lindsay, Memon, and Bull (1995). Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 3, 363-365.

Kelley, C. M., & Lindsay, D. S. (1996). Conscious and unconscious forms of memory. In E. L. Bjork & R. A. Bjork (Eds.), Handbook of perception and cognition: Memory (Vol. 10) (pp. 31-63). New York: Academic Press.

Lindsay, D. S. (1996). Contextualizing and clarifying criticisms of memory work in psychotherapy. In K. Pezdek & W. P. Banks (Eds.), The recovered memory/false memory debate (pp. 267-278). New York: Academic Press. (Reprinted from Applied Cognitive Psychology, 3, 426-437)

Weingardt, K. R., Loftus, E. F., & Lindsay, D. S. (1995). Misinformation revisited: New evidence on the suggestibility of memory. Memory and Cognition, 23, 72-82.

Lindsay, D. S., & Read, J. D. (1995). Memory, remembering, and misremembering. PTSD Research Quarterly, 6(1), 1-7.

Poole, D. A., Lindsay, D. S., Memon, A., & Bull, R. (1995). Psychotherapy and the recovery of memories of childhood sexual abuse: U.S. and British practitioners’ opinions, practices, and experiences. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 63, 426-437.

Poole, D. A., & Lindsay, D. S. (1995). Interviewing preschoolers: Effects of nonsuggestive techniques, parental coaching, and leading questions on reports of nonexperienced events. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 60, 129-154.

Lindsay, D. S., & Read, J. D. (1995). “Memory work” and recovered memories of childhood sexual abuse: Scientific evidence and public, professional, and personal issues. Psychology, Public Policy, and the Law, 1, 846-908.

Lindsay, D. S., & Poole, D. A. (1995). Remembering childhood sexual abuse in therapy: Psychotherapists’ self-reported beliefs, practices, and experiences. The Journal of Psychiatry and Law, 23(3), 461-476.

Lindsay, D. S., Gonzales, V., & Eso, K. (1995). Aware and unaware uses of memories of postevent suggestions. In M. S. Zaragoza, J. R. Graham, G. C. N. Hall, R. Hirschman, & Y.S. Ben-Porath  (Eds.), Memory and testimony in the child witness (pp. 86-108). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Poole, D. A., & Lindsay, D. S. (1995). Cognitive development. In R. Bull, J. Aldridge, & D. Glasgow (Eds.), Interviewing children for legal purposes. Portsmouth: University of Portsmouth.

Weingardt, K. R., Loftus, E. F., & Lindsay, D. S. (1995). Misinformation revisited: New evidence on the suggestibility of memory. Memory and Cognition, 23, 72-82.

Belli, R. F., Lindsay, D. S., Gales, M. S., & McCarthy, T. T. (1994). Memory impairment and source misattribution in postevent misinformation experiments with short retention intervals. Memory and Cognition, 22, 40-54.

Lindsay, D. S., & Jacoby, L. L. (1994). Stroop process dissociations: The relationship between facilitation and interference. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 20, 219-234.

Lindsay, D. S., & Read, J. D. (1994). Psychotherapy and memories of childhood sexual abuse: A cognitive perspective. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 8, 281-338.

Read, J. D., & Lindsay, D. S. (1994). Moving toward a middle ground on the ‘false memory debate’: Reply to commentaries on Lindsay and Read. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 8, 407-435.

Lindsay, D. S. (1994). Memory source monitoring and eyewitness testimony. In D. F. Ross, J. D. Read, & M. P. Toglia (Eds.), Adult eyewitness testimony: Current trends and developments (pp. 27-55). New York: Cambridge University Press.

Lindsay, D. S. (1994). Contextualizing and clarifying criticisms of memory work in psychotherapy. Cognition and Consciousness, 3, 426-437.

Johnson, M. K., Hashtroudi, S., & Lindsay, D. S. (1993). Source monitoring. Psychological Bulletin, 114, 3-28.

Kelley, C. M., & Lindsay, D. S. (1993). Remembering mistaken as knowing: Ease of generation as a basis for confidence in answers to general knowledge questions. Journal of Memory and Language, 32, 1-24.

Lindsay, D. S. (1993). Eyewitness suggestibility. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 2, 86-89.

Toth, J. P., Lindsay, D. S., & Jacoby, L. L. (1992). Awareness, automaticity, and memory dissociations. In L. R. Squire & N. Butters (Eds.), Neuropsychology of memory (2nd ed.) (pp. 46-47). New York: Guilford.

Jacoby, L. L., Toth, J. P., Lindsay, D. S., & Debner, J. (1992). Lectures for a lay person: Methods for revealing unconscious influences. In R. F. Bornstein & T. Pittman (Eds.), Perception without awareness (pp. 81-120). New York: Guilford.

Jacoby, L. L., Lindsay, D. S., & Toth, J. P. (1992). Unconscious influences revealed: Attention, awareness, and control. American Psychologist, 47, 802-809.

Lindsay, D. S. (1991). CHARMed, but not convinced: Comment on Metcalfe (1990). Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 120, 101-105.

Lindsay, D. S., Jack, P. C., Jr., & Christian, M. (1991). Other-race face perception. Journal of Applied Psychology, 76, 587-589.

Lindsay, D. S., & Johnson, M. K. (1991). Source monitoring and recognition memory. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society, 29, 203-205.

Lindsay, D. S., Johnson, M. K., & Kwon, P. (1991). Developmental changes in memory source monitoring. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 52, 297-318.

Lindsay, D. S. (1990). Misleading suggestions can impair eyewitnesses’ ability to remember event details. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 16, 1077-1083.

Lindsay, D. S., & Johnson, M. K. (1989b). The reversed eyewitness suggestibility effect. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society, 27, 111-1139.

Lindsay, D. S., & Johnson, M. K. (1989a). The eyewitness suggestibility effect and memory for source. Memory and Cognition, 17, 349-358.

Lindsay, D. S., & Johnson, M. K. (1987). Reality monitoring and suggestibility: Young children’s ability to discriminate among memories from different sources. In S. J. Ceci, M. P. Toglia, & D. F. Ross (Eds.), Children’s eyewitness memory (pp. 92-121). New York: Springer-Verlag.

Lindsay, D. S., & Creedon, C. F. (1985). Magic revisited: Children’s responses to apparent violations of conservation. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 40, 338-349.