What is this website?

 

 

This is the official website for The Impact of Olfactory  Ability on Social and Mental Health research study conducted by the Risky Behaviour Lab at the University of Victoria.

 

 


Why is researching smell loss important?

As expressed by the National Institutes of Health, “your sense of smell enriches your experience of the world around you. Different scents can change your mood, transport you back to a distant memory, and may even help you bond with loved ones. Your ability to smell also plays a key role in your health. If your ability to smell declines, it can affect your diet and nutrition, physical well-being, and everyday safety” [1]. This is why it is important to research smell loss, to help minimize the impact for affected individuals and contribute to improved patient interventions!

 

 

What is this research study about?

At the Risky Behaviour Lab, we are interested in investigating smell loss to see if social functioning underlies the link between olfactory impairments and reduced mental health. Our goal is to provide the medical community with new information about how smell loss impacts aspects of social life and mental health that could become the basis for future interventions.

Ultimately, we hope that our findings will minimize the impact of smell loss for those affected.

 

 

Who is involved in this project?

The team of researchers includes Dr. Marlise Hofer, Dr. Brianna Turner, and Sydney Waddington from the Risky Behaviour Lab at the University of Victoria.

 

 

Who approved this research study?

This research study has been approved by The Human Research Ethics Board at the University of Victoria.

 

 

Who is funding this research study?

This study is supported by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Health Research BC, and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

 

 

 

 

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References

[1] National Institutes of Health. What Your Nose Knows. (2016). Retrieved April 13th, 2023 from https://newsinhealth.nih.gov/2016/08/what-your-nose-knows.