Tag Archives: nursing

Construction d’un laboratoire “de pointe” à Vancouver pour lutter contre le cancer

January 30, 2024 | CBC Radio-Canada via UVic News

A new cyclotron and radiopharmacy laboratory is currently being installed on the University of British Columbia’s Vancouver campus. The lab, whose goal is to help the fight against cancer in British Columbia, is supported by a $21 million dollar investment from the province as part of its ten-year cancer plan.

In a recent CBC Radio-Canada article about the lab, UVic’s Dr. Damien Contandriopoulos is quoted lauding the investment as a good medium-term care solution for B.C.’s cancer patients. Dr. Contandriopoulos explains that the new lab, however, will not have much effect on patients’ short-term care needs. This is because, initially, a series of delays in the health care process mean that patients end up waiting for care.

A Professor in the University of Victoria’s School of Nursing, Dr. Contandriopoulos’ research focuses primarily on health policy-making processes, evidence-based decision making, and nurse-intensive models of healthcare delivery. Are you interested in learning more about these and other topics from this important UVic scholar? The Copyright and Scholarly Communications Office encourages you to visit UVicSpace, our open access institutional repository, where nine of Dr. Contandriopoulos’ publications are freely available.

Featured Dissertation: Managing the eroding public health nurse role

When it is no longer your call”, a PhD dissertation in the School of Nursing, by Megan Elise Kirk

https://dspace.library.uvic.ca:8443/handle/1828/11785

Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to explain how public health renewal has shaped public health nursing practice, how public health nurses have managed these changes, and the perceived impact of such changes on health outcomes. I used the grounded theory method to develop a theoretical explanation of how public health nurses navigated the changing organizational milieu in British Columbia. I interviewed 29 public health nurses and three public health nursing managers in three health authorities to explicate the impact of healthcare reform initiatives on public health nurses and public health nursing practice. Over the last few decades, there have been several organizational and policy changes in British Columbia, intended to strengthen the health system and health service delivery. These changes have eroded the nature of the public health nurse role and negatively influenced public health nursing practice, undermining the ability of public health nurses to improve population health and health equity. Many participants were concerned about changes in their practice and reported that leaders restricted their role, particularly in their broad health promotion and community development efforts. Nurses in this study highlighted specific organizational and policy changes that have undermined their effectiveness. For example, nurses talked about cuts to the public health budget, the disbanding of health unit structures, the appointment of leaders who lacked public health or public health nursing knowledge and experience, and the increase in mandated targeted public health nursing programs with a corresponding decrease in universal programs. As a result, participants engaged in the process of managing the eroding of the public health nurse role, which comprises five strategies. In standing tall, a number of nurses in this study advocated for their practice and pushed back against decisions that jeopardized the quality of public health nursing programs and services with varying degrees of force. Public health nurse participants also worked within organizational expectations and constraints in the process of getting by. In going underground, several public health nurses engaged in various activities in secret by harnessing their community connections and attended to community issues they believed went unaddressed. A number of nurses, dissatisfied by the state of their role, were contemplating getting out and considered other employment possibilities. Throughout the process of navigating external changes affecting practice, many nurses restored their dedication to the public health nurse role in reaffirming commitment. Given the limited research exploring the impact of healthcare reform and public health renewal on public health nursing practice, this research helps to provide an initial glimpse into the effects of such change on public health nurses in British Columbia.

To read more, visit UVicSpace https://dspace.library.uvic.ca:8443/handle/1828/11785

*UVic’s open access repository, UVicspace, makes worldwide knowledge mobilization possible. Through this platform, researchers at any institution have access to dissertations (and theses and graduate projects) published by our graduate students. This also makes works available to the interested layperson, who may be engaged in learning more about the research being done at UVic, with no paywall. UVic’s graduate students are doing valuable research every day – but sometimes it goes unsung. Our goal with this series is to shine a light on our students by featuring excellence, one achievement at a time.

The UVic LIbraries ePublishing Services Team

Featured Project: Nursing emergency preparedness education

This 2012 project by Stephanie Trowbridge, submitted as part of the Masters of Nursing – Advanced Practice Leadership, asks the question, “Nursing emergency preparedness education: Why do nurses need it? Do nurses have this knowledge?

Abstract:

A review of theoretical and research literature that is relevant to nursing and emergency preparedness is the broad focus of this project. This literature review identifies how and to what extent nurses are being educated on emergency preparedness planning and response. Additionally, this review demonstrates how and why nursing emergency preparedness education is integral to community and hospital response plans. Emergency preparedness education for nurses is examined in light of historical influences, professional responsibilities and collaborations and partnerships. It is anticipated that this project will begin to build a platform that showcases the value and significance of nursing emergency preparedness education.

To read more, visit UVicSpace https://dspace.library.uvic.ca/handle/1828/4006

*UVic’s open access repository, UVicspace, makes worldwide knowledge mobilization possible. Through this platform, researchers at any institution have access to dissertations (and theses and graduate projects) published by our graduate students. This also makes works available to the interested layperson, who may be engaged in learning more about the research being done at UVic, with no paywall. UVic’s graduate students are doing valuable research every day – but sometimes it goes unsung. Our goal with this series is to shine a light on our students by featuring excellence, one achievement at a time.

The UVic LIbraries ePublishing Services Team

New program provides mobile end-of-life support to people in poverty

September, 2019 | UVic News & UVic News

In 2 recent UVic News articles, Dr. Kelli Stajduhar has been recognized for her work in developing a Palliative Outreach Resource Team (PORT) in Victoria.

‘The Palliative Outreach Resource Team (PORT) is a collaboration of the University of Victoria, Island Health, Victoria Cool Aid and Victoria Hospice. PORT acts as a bridge between people with serious illness and their caregivers, palliative care, and other health and social support systems.

The program is built upon lessons learned from a three-year study led by UVic palliative care researcher Kelli Stajduhar, lead investigator of the Equity in Palliative Approaches to Care program with the Institute on Aging & Lifelong Health and the School of Nursing.’

PORT endeavors to fulfill the important need for respectful end-of-life care within vulnerable portions of the Victoria community whereby…

‘Mirroring similar models in Toronto and Calgary, people can self-refer or be referred by their caregivers to a palliative care nurse and a physician who manage the pain and symptoms related to life-limiting illness, support chosen family and caregivers, and provide grief and bereavement support.’

Dr. Stajduhar has published several open access papers that you can access via our institutional repository UVicSpace – you can read them now by clicking here and here.

The Copyright and Scholarly Communications office located in the UVic McPherson library wish PORT much success!

New health data added to DataVerse at UVic

Canada Health Infoway works closely with its partners to assess the landscape of digital health and its value to Canadians and the healthcare system. They have produced some unique data that may be valuable doing research in the area across the country. In August 2016, Infoway contributed 2 initial datasets to UVic’s Dataverse Network:

UVic’s Dataverse Network is a highly visible tool used by researchers and is intended to help universities share publicly funded research data with Canadians and researchers worldwide. The Dataverse Network is an open source application for publishing, referencing, extracting and analyzing research data.