Category Archives: New Resources

Featured thesis: Oh nisa’taro:ten? Learning how to sken:nen as a contemporary Haudenosaunee woman

by Emily Charmaine Coon

https://dspace.library.uvic.ca:8443/handle/1828/11529

Abstract:

The Haudenosaunee Confederacy is threaded together with sken:nen, the radical practice of peacemaking. As a Kanien’keha:ka woman, I am responsible for finding ways of bringing our peace-full teachings, gifts and intellect into the future. This thesis braids together a resurgent ethic of sken:nen with Haudenosaunee knowledges, Indigenous feminisms and decolonial futurities by taking up the question: Oh nisa’taro:ten? (What is the contour of your clay?), posed in Kanien’keha to situate me in relation to the lands I come from. I am taking this ancestral question seriously by exploring the relationships that make up the ‘clay’ of my contemporary Haudenosaunee Indigeneity as it is shaped by life in an active settler colonial state. Tracing the rhythmic gestures of my grandmothers’ hands, I have created a patchworking star quilt methodology to gather fragments of my decolonial curiosities, weaving them into layered story-maps that capture constellations of my movements through settler occupied places. Through the assimilative policies of the Indian Act, quilting simultaneously became an act of survivance and resistance for my grandmothers; by picking up an intergenerational practice of patchworking as methodology, I am jumping into the ruptures of my contemporary Haundenosaunee identity, roles and responsibilities. Patchworking story-maps involves tracing genealogies of intergenerational trauma, rupturing geographies of lateral violence, overflowing either/or binary cuts of identity (non)belonging, and navigating the urbanized displacements of Indigenous peoples from lands, communities and relationships. In an effort to mobilize the knowledges and practices of sken:nen, and to ensure that my work is accessible to a wider audience, my story-maps have been shared in a digital format using Instagram to stitch moments of Indigenous presence, memory and language (back) into the fabric of cityscapes that are riddled with the logics of settler colonialism. This thesis aims to create generative spaces to explore, transform and (re)imagine futurities of peacemaking that move towards more accountable and inclusive webs of relationality rooted in fluid traditions and (star)world building.

To read more, visit UVicSpace https://dspace.library.uvic.ca:8443/handle/1828/11529

*UVic’s open access repository, UVicspace, makes worldwide knowledge mobilization possible. Through this platform, researchers at any institution have access to dissertations (and theses and graduate projects) published by our graduate students. This also makes works available to the interested layperson, who may be engaged in learning more about the research being done at UVic, with no paywall. UVic’s graduate students are doing valuable research every day – but sometimes it goes unsung. Our goal with this series is to shine a light on our students by featuring excellence, one achievement at a time.

The UVic LIbraries ePublishing Services Team

Astronomical Society and undergraduate research

January 2020

The Astronomical Society of the Pacific Conference Series has published its first Compendium of Undergraduate Research in Astronomy and Space Physics. The papers will be published electronically as they are published throughout the year. They will also be open access!

2020 Compendium Table of Contents: http://www.aspbooks.org/a/volumes/table_of_contents/?book_id=602

 

Featured Thesis: Chinese Religious Life in Victoria, BC 1858-1930

This M.A. History thesis details the religious interactions between traditional Chinese culture and Victoria’s mainstream society in the early days of the city.

Chinese Religious Life in Victoria, BC 1858-1930

by Liang Han

Abstract:

Between 1858 and 1930, Victoria’s Chinese immigrants brought their homeland religions to the Canadian city of Victoria BC. They experienced a broad range of challenges as they attempted to fit into the mainstream society. This continual struggle affected their religious lives in particular as they sought to adjust in ways that helped them deal with racial discrimination. As a result, Chinese folk religions, especially those emphasizing ancestral worship, became intertwined with local Chinese associations as a way of strengthening the emotional connections between association members. Some associations broadened their membership by adding ancestral deities or worshiping the deity of sworn brotherhood in a bid to create broader connections among the Chinese men who dominated Victoria’s Chinese community. At the same time, Christians, who practiced the religion of Victoria’s mainstream society, reached out to the Chinese, at first by offering practical language training and later by establishing missions and churches that focused on the Chinese. Many Chinese immigrants welcomed English classes and the social opportunities that churches provided but resisted conversion, as the discrimination they faced in mainstream society had left them sceptical about Christianity, which was seen as closely linked to the dominant Western culture. However, Chinese attitudes towards Christianity became more favorable after the 1910s, when the patriotism of Chinese immigrants led them to support revolutionary leader Sun Yat-sen and his new Chinese government, which promoted Christianity as a symbol of modernity. In general, the Chinese in Victoria were not especially enthusiastic about religion, whether Chinese folk religion or Christianity, although women were generally more interested in religion than men. Although many Chinese pragmatically sought comfort and assistance from both religions, they followed Confucian orthodoxy in focusing primarily on daily life rather than religious life. At the same time, over the decades between 1858 and 1930 both Chinese folk religion and Christianity affected the Chinese community as this community adopted a mixture of Western and Eastern cultures, including religious elements from both cultures.

To read more, visit UVicSpace https://dspace.library.uvic.ca:8443/handle/1828/11071

*UVic’s open access repository, UVicspace, makes worldwide knowledge mobilization possible. Through this platform, researchers at any institution have access to dissertations (and theses and graduate projects) published by our graduate students. This also makes works available to the interested layperson, who may be engaged in learning more about the research being done at UVic, with no paywall. UVic’s graduate students are doing valuable research every day – but sometimes it goes unsung. Our goal with this series is to shine a light on our students by featuring excellence, one achievement at a time.

The UVic LIbraries ePublishing Services Team

Featured Dissertation: Virtually invisible: at-risk boys and their concepts of self as beings-in-the-online-world

Dissertation of the Day*

UVic News recently announced that UVic ranks among the top performers in 10 fields, according to the 2019 Quacquarelli Symonds (QS) World University Rankings by Subject.  To celebrate, we would like to feature some of the graduate research under each of these disciplines. Today, we feature a 2002 Education (Curriculum and Instruction) dissertation:

Virtually invisible: at-risk boys and their concepts of self as beings-in-the-online-world

by Jordan Tinney

Abstract:

As communications technologies flourish, increasing numbers of students are spending inordinate amounts of time in online communities. Often, students who spend excess time online are boys who are experiencing difficulty in school. For many of these boys, their participation in virtual worlds and their use of computers has shown them to be successful learners. However, for a variety of reasons, these boys continue to be disengaged in school and seriously at-risk for failure. This study explores the lives of at-risk boys who spend several hours a day in online worlds. The researcher is a long time participant in virtual worlds and through interviews examines the notions of self in online communities and how these at-risk boys navigate between their lives on and offline. The students’ participation in online forums may provide helpful insights into who they are and how we can best meet their needs in our schools. In addition to an examination of the social formation of self in online worlds, this study mounts a critique of the promotion of an Internet “culture” or “community”. In the text-based world of Internet Relay Chat (IRC), many of the foundations of what constitutes a culture may be absent and researchers may be too quick in accepting such forums as true communities.

To read more, visit UVicSpace https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/10357

*UVic’s open access repository, UVicspace, makes worldwide knowledge mobilization possible. Through this platform, researchers at any institution have access to dissertations (and theses and graduate projects) published by our graduate students. This also makes works available to the interested layperson, who may be engaged in learning more about the research being done at UVic, with no paywall. UVic’s graduate students are doing valuable research every day – but sometimes it goes unsung. Our goal with this series is to shine a light on our students by featuring excellence, one achievement at a time.

The UVic LIbraries ePublishing Services Team

Featured Thesis: SmartGrocer – a context-aware personalized grocery system

UVic News recently announced that UVic ranks among the top performers in 10 fields, according to the 2019 Quacquarelli Symonds (QS) World University Rankings by Subject.  To celebrate, we would like to feature some of the graduate research under each of these disciplines. Today, I will start with a 2018 Computer Science graduate thesis:

SmartGrocer: a context-aware personalized grocery system

by Roshni Jain

Abstract:

Grocery shopping is a routine task that people perform to fulfill their needs for food. We suspect many people would like to do grocery shopping with the grocery list to save their money and time. While creating a grocery list, people have to follow some steps such as checking the ingredients inventory available in their homes, planning meals for few days or weeks, creating a grocery list based on their meal plan and ingredients inventory status, and looking out for deals or offers, which can be utilized in their grocery purchases. These steps can be repetitive and involve people’s manual effort and a considerable amount of time to carry out effectively that makes the creation of a grocery list difficult to accomplish every time considering people’s busy modern lifestyles. As many grocers begin to leverage technology, they have an opportunity to understand the relationship between the people buying behavior from their purchasing history and stores’ grocery information to make profit-driven decisions and promote the reduction of food waste in stores. This thesis presents SmartGrocer, a context-aware personalized grocery system that dynamically gathers user context including their past purchase history and budget, and store context including clearance grocery inventory that consists of those ingredients that are soon-to-expire or being on sale to recommend personalized coupons to users. The personalized coupons are automatically applied to the missing ingredients of recipes thereby reducing the recipes’ cost and recommending them according to the user’s food budget. Recommendation of personalized coupons to users is an effective promotional strategy to not only saving the user’s money but also promoting the reduction of food waste in stores, which eventually drives more profit to the grocery retail businesses. SmartGrocer also automates the whole process of creating a grocery list with minimal effort and time expended by the user by leveraging the user and store context.

To read more, visit UVicSpace https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/9579

*UVic’s open access repository, UVicspace, makes worldwide knowledge mobilization possible. Through this platform, researchers at any institution have access to dissertations (and theses and graduate projects) published by our graduate students. This also makes works available to the interested layperson, who may be engaged in learning more about the research being done at UVic, with no paywall. UVic’s graduate students are doing valuable research every day – but sometimes it goes unsung. Our goal with this series is to shine a light on our students by featuring excellence, one achievement at a time.

The UVic LIbraries ePublishing Services Team

Some Open Textbooks for Business

Here are some examples of resources available to you:

Business Ethics (OpenStax)

  • Business Ethics is designed to meet the scope and sequence requirements of the single-semester business ethics course. This title includes innovative features designed to enhance student learning, including case studies, application scenarios, and links to video interviews with executives, all of which help instill in students a sense of ethical awareness and responsibility.

Communications for Business Professions – Canadian Edition by Business Faculty from Ontario Colleges and eCampusOntario Program Managers (CC-BY-SA)

  • This textbook–adapted from Business Communication for Success–offers a comprehensive, integrated approach to the study and application of written and oral business communication. This edition has significantly reduced the size and scope of the original publication, added Canadian examples, and features a spectrum of current and relevant Canadian business communication topics.

Fundamentals of Business – Canadian Edition by Business Faculty from Ontario Colleges and eCampusOntario Program Managers (CC-BY-SA)

  • This Canadian adaptation is based on Fundamentals of Business and includes Canadian content including examples and statistics. This introductory business textbook covers a variety of topics such as: The Foundations of Business, Economics and Business, Ethics and Social Responsibility, Business in a Global Environment, and more.

Introduction to Business (OpenStax)

  • Introduction to Business covers the scope and sequence of most introductory business courses. The book provides detailed explanations in the context of core themes such as customer satisfaction, ethics, entrepreneurship, global business, and managing change. Introduction to Business includes hundreds of current business examples from a range of industries and geographic locations, which feature a variety of individuals. The outcome is a balanced approach to the theory and application of business concepts, with attention to the knowledge and skills necessary for student success in this course and beyond.

Introduction to Financial Accounting – Third Edition by David Annand, Athabasca University (CC-BY-NC-SA)

  • This third edition is an update of this popular book, based on International Financial Reporting Standards. The textbook is accompanied by many ancillary resources including a student solutions manual and workbook.

Web of Performance book launch (New Zealand)

Author Monica Prendergast speaks to a crowd at the launch of her book, Web of Performance.Last month, Monica Prendergast attended the International Drama in Education Research Institute at the University of Auckland, New Zealand and launched the recently released Web of Performance: An Ensemble Workbook.

The curriculum guide in performance studies, edited with Will Weigler, is intended for students ages 16-20. The workbook uses examples of theatrical performances to help show students and educators the ways in which theatre can make positive impacts on a community.

The project was funded by an SSHRC grant, with additional funding from the Office of Research Services.

“I’m so grateful to Inba Kehoe and her staff in the UVIC ePublishing program,” says Prendergast.

Web of Performance is available for download here: http://dspace.library.uvic.ca/handle/1828/9426.

New Title – Global Corruption

Global Corruption: Law, Theory & Practice (Third Edition) by Gerry Ferguson is a new release published by the University of Victoria. It can be downloaded for free on UVicSpace: https://dspace.library.uvic.ca/handle/1828/9253.

Published under a CC BY-NC-SA license

This book has been specifically created to make it easier for professors to offer a law school course on global corruption. It is issued under a creative commons license and can be used for free in whole or in part for non-commercial purposes. The first chapter sets out the general context of global corruption: its nature and extent, and some views on its historical, social, economic and political dimensions. Each subsequent chapter sets out international standards and requirements in respect to combating corruption – mainly in the UN Convention Against Corruption (UNCAC) and the OECD Bribery of Foreign Officials Convention (OECD Convention). The laws of the United States and United Kingdom are then set out as examples of how those Convention standards and requirements are met in two influential jurisdictions. Finally, the law of Canada is set out. Thus, a professor from Africa, Australia, New Zealand or English speaking countries in Asia and Europe has a nearly complete coursebook – for example, that professor can delete the Canadian sections of this book and insert the law and practices of his or her home country in their place. While primarily directed to a law school course on global corruption, this book will be of interest and use to professors teaching courses on corruption from other academic disciplines and to lawyers and other anti-corruption practitioners.

Praise for the book

Global Corruption is the Canadian (and arguably US and UK) definitive text on ABAC. Like Hogg on constitutional law, but for anticorruption. Throughout the day, my counterparts from the other banks emailed back their thanks and great surprise at the sheer wealth of the resource that Ferguson has provided.
– Daryl Davis (H.B.A., B.C.L. & LL. B)
Chief Advisor, Sanctions and Anti-Corruption Program Management, National Bank of Canada

In Global Corruption, Ferguson provides a rich analysis of the nature, scope and extent of global corruption by canvassing international requirements and UK, US and Canadian law on a vast array of topics from the investigation, prosecution and sanctioning of corruption, money laundering and the recovery of corruption proceeds to laws and policies on preventative mechanisms such as the regulation of public procurement, lobbying, campaign financing, whistleblowing and other corruption risks.
– Dr. Leonardo Borlini
Department of Law, Bocconi University & Co-author of Corruption: Economic Analysis and Law

This book by Ferguson is an invaluable resource for the international community as he provides an amazing wealth of information and analysis for students and practitioners on the scope and details of the international standards against corruption, including the UN and OECD conventions as well as the various ways in which the laws of US, UK and Canada attempt to combat corruption.
– Dr. Nikos Passas
Professor of Criminology & Criminal Justice, Northeastern University, Senior Fellow of the Financial Integrity Institute, Case Western Reserve School of Law Chair, Academic Council of Anti-Corruption Academy, India & 2017 Dr Jean Mayer Global Citizenship Award Recipient