Author Archives: Rachel Corder

C. Butterfield – Emperor of China; Mute Canary; Executioner of Peru

Each year UVic faculty, staff, students, alumni, and retirees produce an incredible amount of intellectual content reflecting their breadth and diversity of research, teaching, personal, and professional interests. A list of these works is available here.

This new English translation of The Emperor of China, The Mute Canary & The Executioner of Peru by UVic School of Music faculty member Christopher Butterfield captures the character of the original French versions written by Georges Ribemont-Dessaignes.

About the BookThe Emporer of China

Three savage plays from the man André Breton designated as one of the only “true Dadas” (alongside Tristan Tzara and Francis Picabia): The Emperor of China (1916), The Mute Canary (1920) and The Executioner of Peru (1928). The first two have long been acknowledged as highpoints in the Dada movement’s contribution to the theater, but in their brutal depictions of violent sexuality and nightmarish tyranny, and their casts of manipulative bureaucrats, murderous henchmen, insane dictators, lascivious virgins, Ubuesque cuckolds and nonsense-spewing enigmas, these plays also echo the work of such other dissident surrealists of the era as Georges Bataille and André Masson. These unsettling theatrical works were significant anticipations of Antonin Artaud’s Theater of Cruelty and the Theater of the Absurd of the 1960s.

About the Translator

CButterfield_07_x198Christopher Butterfield studied composition with Rudolf Komorous at the University of Victoria (B.Mus. 1975) and with Bülent Arel at the State University of New York at Stony Brook (M.A. 1977). He lived in Toronto between 1977 and 1992, where he was active as a performance artist, rock guitar player, and composer. In 1979/1980 he taught in the graduate visual arts department at Concordia University in Montreal, and in 1986 and 1989 he taught in the School for the Contemporary Arts at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver. In 1992 he was appointed Assistant Professor of Composition at the University of Victoria. His music has been performed across Canada and in Europe, and is recorded on the CBC and Artifact labels.

About the Author

Georges Ribemont-Dessaignes (1884–1974) was a French writer and artist, and one of the fiercest adherents of the Paris Dada movement, acting as the group’s secretary, and for which he authored some of its most vitriolic texts. Disenchanted with the Surrealist movement that followed, Ribemont-Dessaignes allied himself instead with such other Surrealist dissidents as René Daumal and the Grand Jeu. Throughout his long life, Ribemont-Dessaignes authored a sizable oeuvre of novels, plays, poetry, essays and memoirs.

E. Brunet-Jailly – Border Disputes

Each year UVic faculty, staff, students, alumni, and retirees produce an incredible amount of intellectual content reflecting their breadth and diversity of research, teaching, personal, and professional interests. A list of these works is available here.

The new book Border Disputes: A Global Encyclopedia edited by UVic faculty member Emmanuel Brunet-Jailley looks at approximately 80 current international border disputes and conflicts.  It is an ideal resource for anyone studying current events, social studies, geopolitics, conflict resolution, and political science.

Border DisputesAbout the Book

Border disputes are a common source of political instability and military conflict around the globe, both in the present day and throughout history. Border Disputes: A Global Encyclopedia will serve as an invaluable resource for students studying social studies, political science, human geography, or related subjects.

Each volume of this expansive encyclopedia begins with an accessible introduction to the type of dispute to be discussed, identifying the conflict as territorial (Volume 1), positional (Volume 2), or functional (Volume 3). Following the background essay in each volume are comprehensive case study entries on specific international conflicts, examining the disputed area, the reasons for the dispute, and cultural, political, historical, and legal issues relating to the dispute. The third volume will also provide primary documents of legal rulings and important resolutions of various disputes, as well as profiles of key organizations relating to border studies and specific border dispute commissions.

About the Editoremmanuelbrunetjailly

Emmanuel Brunet-Jailly, PhD, is professor in the School of Public Administration at the University of Victoria. The director of University of Victoria’s European Union Center of Excellence, he also holds a Jean Monnet Chair in European urban and border region policy. Brunet-Jailly is chief editor of Journal of Borderlands Studies and author of several books and nearly 100 articles and book chapters. He received his doctorate at the University of Western Ontario.

Praise for the Book

“Overall, this is a unique resource that should provide an excellent foundation for further study of these matters for high school students as well as more experienced users, such as graduate students and faculty.”—Booklist

“Aimed at high school, community college, and beginning college students, this book achieves a purpose as a serviceable reference befitting its target audience. . . . Summing Up: Recommended. Beginning students; general readers.”—Choice

“The format in general is an easy to understand introduction followed by more in-depth analysis. As with all ABC-Clio works, the organization is clear, indexing is robust and the essays include a rich variety of cited resources for further exploration. . . . . This work is a good starting place for teens and college students. The writing provides a clear, straightforward narrative without a lot of jargon. The electronic version is easy to navigate, share, and cite.”—Reference Reviews

Peter Baskerville – Lives in Transition

Each year UVic faculty, staff, students, alumni, and retirees produce an incredible amount of intellectual content reflecting their breadth and diversity of research, teaching, personal, and professional interests. A list of these works is available here.

UVic Professor Emeritus Peter Baskerville has recently edited a new publication for McGill-Queen’s UP titled Lives in Transition: Longitudinal Analysis from Historical Sources.  Lives in Transition demonstrates how the analysis of collective experience through both individual-level and large-scale data at different moments in history opens up important avenues for social science and historical research.Lives in Transition

About the Book

Collective histories and broad social change are informed by the ways in which personal lives unfold. Lives in Transition examines individual experiences within such collective histories during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

This collection brings together sources from Europe, North America, and Australia in order to advance the field of quantitative longitudinal historical research. The essays examine the lives and movements of various populations over time that were important for Europe and its overseas settlements – including the experience of convicts transported to Australia and Scots who moved freely to New Zealand. The micro-level roots of economic change and social mobility of settler society are analyzed through populations studies of Chicago, Montreal, as well as rural communities in Canada and the United States. Several studies also explore ethnic inequality as experienced by Polish immigrants, French-Canadians, and Aboriginal peoples in Canada.

About the Editors

One of Canada’s leading business social scientists, Dr. Peter Baskerville is described by the Royal Society of Canada as “one of the world’s leading historians engaged in inter-disciplinary research on the making of modern society.” Baskerville is still an active researcher and desires to make history accessible, relevant, and applicable by using the past to inform the future. Although based in Victoria, Baskerville holds the Chair of Modern Western Canadian History at the University of Alberta.

Kris Inwood is a professor in Economics and History at the University of Guelph whose interests lie in the borderlands between history and the social sciences. His teaching explores economic and business history, quantitative social history, and economic development. His research investigates inequality, changes in physical well-being, and the standard of living.

Praise for the Book

“The collection succeeds in pointing to the exciting potential of longitudinal analysis. In such skilled hands, the approach serves to dissolve older simplicities, to complicate transitions once seen as linear, and to reinforce the multiplicity of conditions affecting mobility.” Eric W. Sager, The Canadian Historical Review 97:1

“The collection establishes the notion of a translator’s body of work and studies it from various angles.” The Malahat Review

“The use of longitudinal historical data created by linking individual-level information in two or more large-scale databases is a relatively new technique to study patterns of social and geographic mobility. The chapters in Lives in Transition draw on census material from Canada, the United States, Australia, and New Zealand and, as a result, scholars from an array of countries will be able to see firsthand how this technique can generate new and interesting lines of historical and sociological inquiry.” Vic Satzewich, Department of Sociology, McMaster University

D. Galloway et al – Immigration and Refugee Law, 2e

Each year, UVic faculty, staff, students, alumni and retirees produce an incredible amount of intellectual content reflecting their breadth and diversity of research, teaching, personal and professional interests. A list of these works is available here.

UVic is pleased to feature a recent publication edited by UVic faculty member, Donald Galloway.  His book, Immigration and Refugee Law: Cases, Materials, and Commentary, 2nd edition is a comprehensive look at immigration issues in Canadian law.

About the Book

The structure of Canadian migration law has been transformed significantly, on both federal and provincial levels, with respect to temporary and permanent migration, Immigration and Refugeenational security, Canada’s deportation regime, inland refugee determination, family class, and economic immigration. In response to these changes, the second edition of this foundational casebook has been completely rewritten and restructured to achieve a streamlined and coherent survey of Canada’s current immigration law and policy.

In the second edition of Immigration and Refugee Law: Cases, Materials, and Commentary, new articles and essays have been added to illuminate central themes in the contemporary study of the Canadian immigration system, including security, criminalization, and sovereignty. Overviews at the beginning of each chapter illustrate overarching conceptual relationships between topics and facilitate efficient referencing.

This ambitious text explores the current state of Canada’s evolving immigration system, surveyed in historic, social, and comparative contexts. Insightful commentary on racial, gender, and class dimensions contributes to a thorough and multi-faceted analysis.

galloway-profileAbout Donald Galloway

Donald Galloway (LLB, University of Edinburgh; LLM, Harvard) is a Professor of Law at the University of Victoria. He specializes in immigration law, citizenship law, and refugee law. He has authored and co-authored three general texts on Canadian immigration law. He has served as a member of the Immigration and Refugee Board, was the founding President of the Canadian Association for Refugee and Forced Migration Studies, and has been an executive member of the Canadian Association of Refugee Lawyers, serving as the co-chair of its Legal Research Committee.

About the Other Editors

Sharry Aiken (BA, MA, LLB, LLM) is an associate professor in the Faculty of Law at Queen’s University, where she teaches immigration law, international refugee law, international human rights, and administrative law. A past president of the Canadian Council for Refugees and former editor-in-chief of Refuge (2001-2011), Sharry continues to be actively engaged in advocacy and pro bono litigation.

Catherine Dauvergne (BA, MA, LLB, PhD) is a Professor of Law at the University of British Columbia and a Fellow of the Trudeau Foundation. She teaches, researches, and writes in the area of migration law and is involved in pro bono litigation. Dauvergne has recently completed a study of the failure of Canada’s Charter of Rights and Freedoms to protect the rights of non-citizens.

Colin Grey (LLB, LLM, JSD) is Professeur régulier en droit des migrations at the University of Québec à Montréal (UQAM). He is the author of Justice and Authority in Immigration Law, a work of legal and political theory. He is also a former legal advisor for the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada.

Audrey Macklin (BSc, LLB) is Professor of Law at the University of Toronto and Chair in human rights law. She teaches, researches, and writes in the areas of migration and citizenship law, gender and culture, and business and human rights. From 1994-96, Macklin was a member of Canada’s Immigration and Refugee Board. She has represented human rights organizations as an intervener in several migration and human rights cases before the Federal Court and the Supreme Court of Canada.

Matthew Adams – British Anarchism

Each year, UVic faculty, staff, students, alumni and retirees produce an incredible amount of intellectual content reflecting their breadth and diversity of research, teaching, personal and professional interests. A list of these works is available here.

210During his recent Postdoctoral fellowship at UVic, Adam S. Matthews published the book Kropotkin, Read and the Intellectual History of British Anarchism: Between Reason and Romanticism.  His book will delight historians and philosophers alike!

About the Book

Although marginal as a political force, anarchist ideas developed in Britain into a political tradition. This book explores this lost history, offering a new appraisal of the work of Kropotkin and Read, and examining the ways in which they endeavoured to articulate a politics fit for the particular challenges of Britain’s modern history.

Praise for the Book

“The strength of Adams’ interesting and intelligent book is that it gives us a view of anarchism as a dynamic tradition of thought that is integral to any wider intellectual history.” – Peter Ryley, European Review of History 23:1, 297-298

“In a well-argued, contextualised account, Adams succeeds in restoring Kropotkin to the centre of socialist and anarchist debates in Britain in the late Victorian period. He also provides an admirably lively account of the intellectual inheritance of these engagements in subsequent decades through the lens of Herbert Read’s life and ideas, restoring a sense of the vibrancy and sophistication of left-wing political theory through this period.” – Greg Claeys, Royal Holloway, University of London, UK

“Adams’s book is a welcome addition to a growing number of studies aimed at recapturing the largely lost tradition of British anarchism and plugging a significant hole in our understanding of anarchist history and ideas.” – Benjamin J. Pauli, New Political Science 38:2, 292-294

About the Author

s200_matthew_s..adamsMatthew Adams took up his position as Banting Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Victoria in 2013, under the mentorship of Allan Antliff. His postdoctoral project, The Ideas Factory: Modernism and the Cultural Politics of Anglo-Canadian Anarchism, 1936-1970, explores the attempts of Herbert Read, George Woodcock, and Alex Comfort, to articulate a distinctively anarchist cultural politics in the mid-twentieth century. He has published in a number of journals, including History of European Ideas, History of Political Thought, Anarchist Studies, and European Review of History. He currently has an essay collection under contract with Manchester University Press, Anarchism 1914-1918: Internationalism, Militarism, and War, that he is editing with Dr Ruth Kinna (Loughborough University). In July 2016, Matthew will be leaving the University of Victoria to take a position with Loughborough University.

Troy Wilson – The Duck Says

Each year, UVic faculty, staff, students, aPicturelumni and retirees produce an incredible amount of intellectual content reflecting their breadth and diversity of research, teaching, personal and professional interests.

UVic Alumnus Troy Wilson’s latest book, The Duck Says, is a fun read for the kids – and the parents will enjoy it too!  Troy Wilson recently recently appeared as a panelist at the Spring 2016 UVic Author Celebration event and spoke about the process of creating this book.

About the Book

Follow the duck in this madcap romp around the farmyard, which will have kids delighting in his clueless antics and witty wordplay. Bouncing rhymes are perfectly paired with colourful, exuberant art full of visual gags that will have readers laughing along and anticipating what will happen next.  A little absurd, a lot slapstick, and all good fun, this is one to keep within arms reach at storytime.

About the Author0317165126

Troy Wilson is the author of the acclaimed picture book Perfect Man, as well as numerous kids’ stories for magazines like chickaDEE, Chirp, and Highlights for Children. You can check in with Troy Wilson on his website – Troy Story.

Praise for the Book

“A fun ride.” –National Post

“This storytime crowd pleaser will have children saying ‘Read it again.'” –The National Reading Campaign

The Duck Says is a highly entertaining, laugh-out-loud, story of the madcap adventures of a white duck.” –Resource Links

“The Duck Says, by Troy Wilson, is an entertaining parody of an animal sounds book that works seamlessly with Mike Boldt’s bright comic illustrations to create a humourous story with a surprising level of depth….Highly Recommended.” –CM: Canadian Review of Materials

Frances Backhouse – Once They Were Hats

Each year, UVic faculty, staff, students, alumni and retirees produce an incredible amount of intellectual content reflecting their breadth and diversity of research, teaching, personal and professional interests.

Once They Were Once They were HatsHats: In Search of the Mighty Beaver is the newest publication from Frances Backhouse, a University of Victoria alum and a member of UVic’s Writing Dept. Frances Backhouse recently appeared as a panelist at the Spring 2016 UVic Author Celebration event and discussed the process of writing this truly Canadian text.

About the Book

Beavers, those icons of industriousness, have been gnawing down trees, building dams, shaping the land, and creating critical habitat in North America for at least a million years. Once one of the continent’s most ubiquitous ma m mals, they ranged from the Atlantic to the Pacific, and from the Rio Grande to the edge of the northern tundra. Wherever there was wood and water, there were beavers — 60 million (or more) — and wherever there were beavers, there were intricate natural communities that depended on their activities. Then the European fur traders arrived. In Once They Were Hats, Frances Backhouse examines humanity’s 15,000-year relationship with Castor canadensis, and the beaver’s even older relationship with North American landscapes and ecosystems.

In Once They Were Hats, Frances Backhouse examines humanity’s 15,000-year relationship with Castor canadensis, and the beaver’s even older relationship with North American landscapes and ecosystems. From the waterlogged environs of the Beaver Capital of Canada to the wilderness cabin that controversial conservationist Grey Owl shared with pet beavers; from a bustling workshop where craftsmen make beaver-felt cowboy h0317165087ats using century-old tools to a tidal marsh where an almost-lost link between beavers and salmon was recently found, Backhouse goes on a journey of discovery to find out what happened after we nearly wiped this essential animal off the map, and how we can learn to live with beavers now that they’re returning.

About the Author 

Frances Backhouse is the author of five books, including Children of the Klondike, winner of the 2010 City of Victoria Butler Book Prize. She is also a veteran freelance magazine writer and teaches creative nonfiction at the University of Victoria. 

Praise for the Book

“Frances Backhouse has written a wise and wily book, effortlessly blending history, natural history, science and sense, she tells us much that we didn’t know about our national totem, and about the persistence of nature caught in the spotlight of civilization.” — Wayne Grady, author of The Natural History of the Great Lakes

“Backhouse’s history of the web-footed mammals that have a historic tie to Canadian identity makes for unexpectedly delightful reading — there is much to learn from the buck-toothed rodents of yore.” — National Post

“Fascinating and smartly written.” — Globe and Mail

“Backhouse is a skilled and personable narrator who guides us on a tour of the long, fond and sometimes lethal relationship we have entertained with this pudgy little rodent.” — Literary Review of Canada

Robert Hancock – Franz Boas Papers

Each year, UVic faculty, staff, students, alumni and retirees produce an incredible amount of intellectual content reflecting the breadth and diversity of research, teaching, personal and professional interests.

We invite you to exFranz Boas Papersplore the new title The Franz Boas Papers, Volume 1: Franz Boas as Public Intellectual—Theory, Ethnography, Activism, edited in part by University of Victoria alum and faculty member, Robert Hancock.  Robert Hancock recently appeared as a panelist at the Spring 2016 UVic Author Celebration event and spoke about the process of editing this text.

About the Book

This inaugural volume of The Franz Boas Papers Documentary Edition series presents current scholarship from the various academic disciplines that were shaped and continue to be influenced by Franz Boas (1858–1942). Few of Boas’s intellectual progeny span the range of his disciplinary and public engagements. In his later career, Boas moved beyond Native American studies to become a public intellectual and advocate for social justice, particularly with reference to racism against African Americans and Jews and discrimination against women in science. He was a passionate defender of academic freedom, rigorous scholarship, and anthropology as a humane calling.

The Franz Boas Papers, Volume 1 examines Boas’s stature as a public intellectual in three crucial dimensions: theory, ethnography, and activism. The volume’s contributors move across many of the disciplines within which Boas himself worked, bringing to bear their expertise in Native studies, anthropology, history, linguistics, folklore, ethnomusicology, museum studies, comparative literature, English, film studies, philosophy, and journalism. This volume demonstrates a contemporary urgency to reassessing Boas both within the field of anthropology and beyond.

About Robert L.A. Hancock0317165102

Robert L. A. Hancock (Metis) is LE,NONET Academic Coordinator in the Office of Indigenous Affairs and an adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology and the School of Environmental Studies at the University of Victoria. He earned a Ph.D. in Interdisciplinary Studies from UVic, and held a SSHRC postdoctoral fellowship in the First Nations Studies program at the University of Western Ontario. His teaching and research is centred on Indigenous–state relations, Metis political thought, and Indigenous education.

Other Editors

Regna Darnell is Distinguished University Professor of Anthropology at the University of Western Ontario. She is the author of Invisible Genealogies: A History of Americanist Anthropology (Nebraska, 2001). Michelle Hamilton is an associate professor and director of public history at the University of Western Ontario. She is the author of Collections and Objections: Aboriginal Material Culture in Southern Ontario.  Joshua Smith is a PhD candidate in anthropology at the University of Western Ontario.

Praise for the Book

“As a stand-alone piece and as a first step in the grand Boas project, this volume is an important and fascinating contribution toward the understanding of a man who, if he did not heroically invent anthropology single-handedly, certainly did have a disproportionate influence on its formation and early direction.”—Jack David Eller, Anthropology Review Database

“Highly recommended.”—CHOICE

“This pathbreaking book transforms our understanding of Franz Boas as both scientist and citizen, going far beyond commonly accepted views of this influential figure of American cultural life. Presented from a firmly contemporary perspective, these important and well-researched essays will surely be the foundation of much future study.”—Ira Jacknis, research anthropologist at the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley